Have You Included Your Pet in Your Disaster Preparedness Planning?

Whether an emergency keeps you away from home for a day, or a week or more, you’ll need essential supplies and an emergency plan for your pets and large animals.

Have a Plan
Know where you and your pets will be going after an emergency. Have at least two pre-planned boarding locations for your animals in case you are sick, injured or must evacuate during a disaster. These facilities should be located away from your home and far apart from each other to reduce the likelihood that they will be affected by the disaster.

Grab-and-Go Kits for Your Small Pets
Assemble emergency kits for your pets and place them in a spot where they are handy to grab. Duffel bags, covered trash containers, or buckets with securely fitting lids make great containers for your pet’s kit. Items to include are:

• Wire cage or carrier with good air circulation along with a cover for sun, rain, ash, etc.
• Sturdy leashes, harnesses and collars with a ground mounting device for tying up pets temporarily
• Food and water for several days
• Your pet’s medications
• Pet beds and toys
• Current photos of you with your pets in case you are separated
• Name and contact information of your veterinarian

Be sure that all dogs, cats and small pets are always wearing collars with securely fastened identification. Identification microchips are highly recommended for all pets.

Horses and Large Animals
Emergency preparedness is important for all animals, but preparedness for horses and other large animals is critical because of their size and special transportation needs.

Horses and large animals should be evacuated as soon as an evacuation warning is issued. Do not wait for an evacuation order. If you’re unprepared or wait until the last minute, you may need to leave your animals behind.

Network with your neighbors prior to an emergency. Work together with those who do not have horse trailers or who may be away during an emergency.

Risks after a Disaster
After the crisis has passed, it may be some time before you can return to your home. Even if your house is intact and you are allowed to return, the area may not be safe for your pets.

Risks to animals after a disaster include:
• Cut paws or feet
• Burns if there has been a fire
• Eating or inhaling toxic substances or residues
• Escaping because of downed fences or other damage
• Loss of shelter and shade
• Lack of water, power, or other services

Keep in mind that when animals return to a changed landscape, they will be upset, disoriented, and easily stressed. Try to be calm and follow normal routines whenever possible.

5 Things You Need to Know Before Investing in Any Emergency Food Storage Products

Are you thinking about starting or adding to your food storage but aren’t sure what’s available? Follow these guidelines to avoid any costly mistakes.

1. How does the food taste?
Yes, if you’re hungry enough just about anything tastes good, especially in an emergency. Why settle for cardboard? Both Wise Foods™ and Daily Bread™ products provide an assortment of great-tasting, gourmet entrees, breakfasts and beverages that your family will love to eat! The entrees consist of both freeze-dried and dehydrated ingredients to insure the best taste, texture and nutritional value.

2. How long can the food be stored before I have to throw it out? Most canned and dry food from the grocery store is only good for two years at the most, requiring frequent replacement of the items. Wise Foods™ and Daily Bread™ have an extended shelf life of up to 25 years.

3. How much space is my food storage going to take? I have limited room. Wise Foods™ meals are packaged in Mylar pouches and then incased in durable plastic containers with handles. Wise Foods™ are light-weight and condensed. A one-year supply of food for an adult with 1,080 meals weighs less than 60 pounds and comes in nine stackable and easy-to-move grab-and-go plastic containers.

Daily Bread™ is packaged in #10 cans, which are then shipped in boxes with four cans per box. A one-year supply for one adult will fit in a space measuring 44 inches high by 130 inches long and 13 inches deep. The boxes are stackable.

Is the food time-consuming or difficult to cook? Both brands couldn’t be simpler to prepare. Just add water and wait 10 to 12 minutes. You don’t even need to heat the water unless you want to. Although, we think it tastes better when you do. What could be easier?

5. How much money is food storage going to cost? Wise Foods™ and Daily Bread™ products are offered at great prices with entrees as low as $1.50 per serving when ordering multi-serving packages. There are many options for the size of your order, ranging from an entree for just two people up to a 12-month supply that will feed four adults. Because the products have a 25 year shelf life, you won’t need to rotate and replace the products for many years, making them even more economical and saving you money.

We hope you never need to rely on your emergency food storage. However, when a disaster occurs, make certain that you and your loved ones are ready.

To order these and other emergency preparedness products, please visit us at http://www.survivalsupplies4u.com.

What’s In Your Grab-and-Go Kit?

Use our checklist to help you put together a potentially life-saving
kit today

The recent natural disasters throughout the world and in the United States
remind us that any of us could be in a similar situation.
We may not experience a flood, hurricane, earthquake or tsunami, but no
part of the world is exempt from natural disasters.

If you had to evacuate your home quickly, what would you do?  Are you prepared with a grab-and-go kit?  If you have one, great!  Be sure to inventory the contents to make certain you have all you need, that the food and water is not out of code, and that every item is in working condition.

If you don’t have a kit, let’s get started. You may wish to have a separate kit for each member of the family.  Determine what will work best for you.  We have ready-made kits, which offer a quick and easy way to begin.

The container should be easy to move and waterproof if possible.  A backpack, a rolling suitcase, or a wheeled trash can hold a lot and are easy to carry, roll or drag if necessary.

Your basic kit should include:

o 1 gallon of water per person per day for at least three days

o At least 3 days of food that is ready to eat or requires minimal preparation

o Manual can opener and other cooking supplies

o A change of clothes, sturdy shoes, and rain gear for each member of the family

o Medications/eyeglasses plus copies of prescriptions for each

o A minimum of $50 cash that is in small bills

o Personal hygiene items (teeth, hair, body, feminine)

o Identification

o First aid kit

o Radio & extra batteries

o Flash drive or external hard drive with copies of important documents, such as

  • Contact list with phone      numbers
  • Insurance policies
  • Home inventory with photos
  • Family photos
  • Birth and death certificates
  • Backup of computer files
  • Medical records
  • Passports, visas
  • Banking and investment  information
  • Wills and trusts
  • Pension and employee benefits information
  • Court documents
  • Mortgage records
  • Tax returns
  • Business records

o Gum and hard candy

o Flashlight & extra batteries

o Basic tools, such as work gloves, pry bar, N95 masks, duct tape, sheet plastic

o Lotion, sun block, lip balm

o Pocket knife

o Waterproof matches

o Cards, games, books, etc. for entertainment

o Extra house and car keys

If you have children, seniors, pets, or disabled members of your family,
make sure that any special items they may need are included in their kits.

If there are items that you may wish to take from your home, such as family
keepsakes, be sure to make a list so you know just what to quickly grab.  Keeping that list inside your kit means that you know exactly where it is, saving you precious time.

For all your emergency preparedness needs, see http://www.SurvivalSupplies4U.com.

COPING WITH DISASTER-RELATED STRESS

Irritability and anger
Loss of appetite
Fatigue
Inability to sleep

Nightmares
Headaches
Hyperactivity
Hyper-alertness

Sadness
Nausea
Lack of concentration
Increase in alcohol or drug consumption

• Talk with someone about your feelings – anger, sorrow and other emotions – even though it may be difficult.

• Seek help from professional counselors who deal with post-disaster stress.

• Do not hold yourself responsible for the disastrous event or be frustrated because you feel you cannot help directly in the rescue work. Do join a Community Emergency Response Team, (CERT) This will give you the training to help those in your neighborhood and then in the other needed areas.

• Take steps to promote your own physical and emotional healing by healthy eating, rest, exercise, relaxation and meditation.

• Maintain a normal family and daily routine, limiting demanding responsibilities on yourself and your family.

• Spend time with family and friends.

• Use existing support groups of family, friends and religious institutions.

• Ensure you are ready for future events by restocking your disaster supplies kits and updating your family disaster plan. Doing these positive actions can be comforting.

Now, Are You Prepared?

N

Credit to Meridian Magazine,  Carolyn Nicolaysen

 

 

 

Here are some headlines from the past several days:

 

“2011 Tornado Season has seen increase in Storms, Record Death Toll”

 

  • “Missouri River Flood of 2011 one for the History Books”
  • “The recent floods and tornado outbreaks mark the most costly disaster in American history”
  • “Food price shock ahead”.

 

All of these are headlines seen in the past few days in June. Is the time for preparing past? No, but it will now be much more expensive than it would have been just a few months ago.

 

The National Weather Service has announced the forecast for the coming hurricane season. Although the prediction is for more named storms this year, that alone is not the most interesting part of the story. What we should really be taking note of is the fact that we are returning to the weather patterns of the 1950s and 1960s. During those years there were serious weather conditions which hit the northeast coast of North America, the jet stream lowered its path, and temperatures were confused – it was much colder in normally warm areas, and much warmer in normally cool areas.

 

We have seen the results this spring with tornadoes not only in the Midwest “Tornado Alley”, but also in diverse places such as California and Massachusetts. All of this news means we can expect to have weather only our parents and grandparents remember well. The time for preparing has not passed, but the urgency has increased.

 

The winter of 2010-2011 has seen record snowfall in all the mountain ranges west of the Mississippi. Spring in these areas has been colder than normal, setting up a disastrous scenario for the remaining weeks of spring and summer. Rivers and reservoirs in some places are overwhelmed, and heat waves may follow the cool spring weather in many areas. Hot weather will eventually come to the West, and when it does there may be severe flooding. Four states not part of the Mississippi River system, where horrific flooding and loss of life and property have already occurred, – Montana, Idaho, Wyoming and South Dakota – have already declared a state of emergency due to flooding.

 

Are you prepared to remain out of your home for a month or more? Are you prepared to be without grocery and pharmacy supplies for weeks? This is already the case in some areas. Do you really still believe natural disasters can’t happen to you?

 

We have heard so much about flooding and tornadoes this year that it should come as no surprise that some North American crops have been destroyed or not planted at all. The logical conclusion: prices will go up.

 

On the other hand – are you aware that in some regions there is still a drought?

 

Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, Florida, Oklahoma, Colorado, Kansas, Georgia, Louisiana, South Carolina and Alabama all have areas of extreme drought or worse “exceptional drought.”

 

This is also the case on other continents:

 

“Several submerged sections of an imperial tomb of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) have resurfaced in east China’s JiangsuProvince as a result of a severe drought that is still affecting the region. The tomb was built for the ancestors of Zhu Yuanzhang, founder and the first emperor of the Ming Dynasty, in AD 1386, on the west bank of the Hongze Lake in Xuyi County of Jiangsu.

 

“The mausoleum was flooded in 1680, when the Yellow River broke its banks, changed course and converged with the nearby HuaiheRiver. Now local residents have got to take their first look at the tomb, which hadn’t seen the light of day in more than 300 years.

 

“Stone arches and other parts of the tomb emerged on Thursday as the lake’s water level continued to recede because of the recent drought. Local residents also got a look at a paved path leading to the tomb.”

 

In China, 725,000 acres of land are drying out causing not only enormous crop loss but leaving 820,000 people in the region without sufficient food and water. Where will the food come from to feed these people? Will China purchase crops normally sold to industrialized nations such as the United States, Canada and Australia, leaving them short?

 

Food riots have already occurred around the world. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization is warning the drought conditions in China, Europe and Great Britain may lead to the worst food inflation we have seen to date. Combine this with the loss of crops in Japan due to the earthquake and tsunami and flooding, plus drought and tornadoes in the United States and the outlook is not good for food supplies and food prices. The fear is food shortages will increase the frequency and intensity of food riots in many more countries.

 

The price of oil has already gone up making the cost of petroleum based items rise. The price of cotton has soared making the cost of everything from clothing to camp tents rise.

 

Has the time for preparing passed? No, but maybe the time to ask what we are preparing for has. It is here. Now is the time to gather your family and to discuss your priorities for the coming year. Summer is almost here and it is not too late to plant a garden. It is not too late to plan a stay-at-home vacation to save money for self reliance goals. Summer vacations from school are the perfect time to clean out used items and sell them at a garage sale or online.

 

There will never be a less expensive time to purchase preparedness items or to learn skills that will save you the money you are now spending on them. Now is the time. Don’t make the mistake of thinking this won’t affect you. It will. Don’t make the mistake of thinking it can wait and looking back months from now and wishing you had taken action when prices were lower.

 



Check out my Website

ow, Are You Prepared?

 

Now, Are You Prepared?

Credit toMeridianMagazine,  Carolyn Nicolaysen

 

Here are some headlines from the past several days:

“2011 Tornado Season has seen increase in Storms, Record Death
Toll”

  • “Missouri River Flood of 2011 one for the
    History Books”
  • “The recent floods and tornado outbreaks mark
    the most costly disaster in American history”
  • “Food price shock ahead”.

All of these are headlines seen in the past few days in June. Is
the time for preparing past? No, but it will now be much more expensive than it
would have been just a few months ago.

The National Weather Service has announced the forecast for the
coming hurricane season. Although the prediction is for more named storms this
year, that alone is not the most interesting part of the story. What we should
really be taking note of is the fact that we are returning to the weather
patterns of the 1950s and 1960s. During those years there were serious weather
conditions which hit the northeast coast of North America, the jet stream
lowered its path, and temperatures were confused – it was much colder in
normally warm areas, and much warmer in normally cool areas.

We have seen the results this spring with tornadoes not only in
the Midwest “Tornado Alley”, but also in diverse places such as California and Massachusetts.
All of this news means we can expect to have weather only our parents and
grandparents remember well. The time for preparing has not passed, but the
urgency has increased.

The winter of 2010-2011 has seen record snowfall in all the
mountain ranges west of the Mississippi.
Spring in these areas has been colder than normal, setting up a disastrous
scenario for the remaining weeks of spring and summer. Rivers and reservoirs in
some places are overwhelmed, and heat waves may follow the cool spring weather
in many areas. Hot weather will eventually come to the West, and when it does
there may be severe flooding. Four states not part of the Mississippi River
system, where horrific flooding and loss of life and property have already
occurred, – Montana, Idaho,
Wyoming and South Dakota – have already declared a state
of emergency due to flooding.

Are you prepared to remain out of your home for a month or more?
Are you prepared to be without grocery and pharmacy supplies for weeks? This is
already the case in some areas. Do you really still believe natural disasters
can’t happen to you?

We have heard so much about flooding and tornadoes this year that
it should come as no surprise that some North American crops have been
destroyed or not planted at all. The logical conclusion: prices will go up.

On the other hand – are you aware that in some regions there is
still a drought?

Texas, Arizona,
New Mexico, Florida,
Oklahoma, Colorado,
Kansas, Georgia,
Louisiana, South Carolina
and Alabama
all have areas of extreme drought or worse “exceptional drought.”

This is also the case on other continents:

“Several submerged sections of an imperial tomb of the Ming
Dynasty (1368-1644) have resurfaced in east China’s
Jiangsu Province as a result of a severe drought
that is still affecting the region. The tomb was built for the ancestors of Zhu
Yuanzhang, founder and the first emperor of the Ming Dynasty, in AD 1386, on
the west bank of the Hongze Lake in Xuyi County of Jiangsu.

“The mausoleum was flooded in 1680, when the Yellow River broke
its banks, changed course and converged with the nearby Huaihe River.
Now local residents have got to take their first look at the tomb, which hadn’t
seen the light of day in more than 300 years.

“Stone arches and other parts of the tomb emerged on Thursday as
the lake’s water level continued to recede because of the recent drought. Local
residents also got a look at a paved path leading to the tomb.”¹

In China,
725,000 acres of land are drying out causing not only enormous crop loss but
leaving 820,000 people in the region without sufficient food and water. Where
will the food come from to feed these people? Will China
purchase crops normally sold to industrialized nations such as the United States, Canada
and Australia,
leaving them short?

Food riots have already occurred around the world. The United
Nations Food and Agriculture Organization is warning the drought conditions in
China, Europe and Great Britain may lead to the worst food inflation we have
seen to date. Combine this with the loss of crops in Japan
due to the earthquake and tsunami and flooding, plus drought and tornadoes in
the United States
and the outlook is not good for food supplies and food prices. The fear is food
shortages will increase the frequency and intensity of food riots in many more
countries.

The price of oil has already gone up making the cost of petroleum
based items rise. The price of cotton has soared making the cost of everything
from clothing to camp tents rise.

Has the time for preparing passed? No, but maybe the time to ask
what we are preparing for has. It is here. Now is the time to gather your
family and to discuss your priorities for the coming year. Summer is almost
here and it is not too late to plant a garden. It is not too late to plan a
stay-at-home vacation to save money for self reliance goals. Summer vacations
from school are the perfect time to clean out used items and sell them at a
garage sale or online.

There will never be a less expensive time to purchase preparedness
items or to learn skills that will save you the money you are now spending on
them. Now is the time. Don’t make the mistake of thinking this won’t affect
you. It will. Don’t make the mistake of thinking it can wait and looking back
months from now and wishing you had taken action when prices were lower.

Check out my Website www.survivalsupplies4u.com

STORM SAFETY PREPAREDNESS

Sudden downpours during the rainy season can cause many water- related problems for residents such as flash flooding, mudslides, and various other problems that may result in damage to your property. Follow these instructional guidelines to help you deal with the rainy season.

Stay away from flood channels and flowing rivers. You can be knocked off your feet in as little as six inches of water.                       Do not attempt to cross flooded areas, and never enter moving water.  If you become trapped in your vehicle, stay with your vehicle.  Relocate to the hood of the vehicle of the water level continues to rise.  When in canyon or mountain areas, be aware of possible flash  flooding or sudden down flows.

For Residents living in flood prone areas:

Obtain sand bags ahead of time! Sandbags and instructional materials are available at most county fire stations.  Fill sandbags one-half full with sand or soil, fold top of sandbag down and rest bag on its folded top. Stack sandbags three levels high but not more than 25 sand bags high.

If your home is on a hillside, plastic sheeting is recommended to prevent over saturation of the soil, but consult first with local Building and Safety officials and/or Public Works Departments for water diversion or protection plans.

Monitor your radio or television news closely for information concerning weather conditions and flooding in your area.

Have an emergency plan that all family members understand. Know how to contact loved one if you are unable to get to your home because of flood-related incidents.

Clear rain gutters and drains ahead of time to help avoid possible roof collapse and other property damage.

Be aware that debris basins can overflow. Be familiar with the area in which you live and have an alternate escape route if you should need to evacuate.

Have enough food, water and batteries included in emergency kits to last for at least 72 hours.

 

P. MICHAEL FREEMAN

FIRE CHIEF

Warning Signals

Do You Know How Emergency Personnel Will Notify You

When There’s an Emergency?

 When disaster strikes, information is a two-way street. Authorities will be trying to reach you, but you’ve got to help them do so. Communities may use different methods of communication, from low-tech approaches (sirens, loudspeakers mounted on poles and police cruisers outfitted with bullhorns) to sophisticated systems (automated telephone-alert networks that dial 2,000 households per minute with messages and instructions). Some communities issue a text message to cell phones, pagers, or other devices. The Federal government is working on similar technology for national emergencies.

 The Emergency Alert System – a national public warning system better know for that piercing test tone over radios and televisions – sends information over major television and radio networks. So, don’t forget your battery-powered or hand-cranked radio or television!

 A more targeted technology is the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (“NOAA”) weather radio, sometimes generically called a “tone alert” radio. The NOAA broadcasts forecasts and warnings for dangerous weather, natural hazards, such as earthquakes, and dangerous incidents, such as chemical spills, 24 hours a day from almost 1,000 transmitters across the country. When one of these events threatens your local area, the system sends a signal that activates your NOAA radio to sound an alarm tone.  After the alarm, the NOAA will broadcast a message with information and instructions to safeguard you and your loved ones.

 Find out in advance which method your community uses. If it offers special services, such as text messaging, sign up for those services. If they broadcast community specific information over a particular radio station, mark that station on your radio dial. During a disaster, turn on your television or radio. Also, consider purchasing a NOAA radio. It’s a great resource if disaster strikes in the middle of the night.

University of Arizona- New CPR Method

Video of new method. via U tube.http://tinyurl.com/2fx8r59

nick@survivalsupplies4u.com

What’s in Your Grab and Go Kit?

What’s in Your Grab and Go Kit?.

Use our checklist to help you put together a potentially life-saving kit today

 

The recent disasters in Japan and New Zealand remind us that any of us could be in a similar situation.  We may not experience an earthquake or tsunami, but no part of the world is exempt from natural disasters.

 

If you had to evacuate your home quickly, what would you do?  Are you prepared with a grab-and-go kit?  If you have one, great!  Be sure to inventory the contents to make certain you have all you need, that the food and water is not out of code, and that every item is in working condition.

 

If you don’t have a kit, lets get started.  You may wish to have a separate kit for each member of the family.  Determine what will work best for you.  We have ready-made kits, which offer a quick and easy way to begin.

 

The container should be easy to move and waterproof if possible.  A backpack, a rolling suitcase, or a wheeled trash can hold a lot and are easy to carry, roll or drag if necessary.

 

Your basic kit should include:

o 1 gallon of water per person per day for at least three days

o At least 3 days of food that is ready to eat or requires minimal preparation

o Manual can opener and other cooking supplies

o A change of clothes, sturdy shoes, and rain gear for each member of the family

o Medications/eyeglasses plus copies of prescriptions for each

o A minimum of $50 cash that is in small bills

o Personal hygiene items (teeth, hair, body, feminine)

o Identification

o First aid kit

o Radio & extra batteries

o Flash drive or external hard drive with copies of important documents, such as

  • Contact list with phone numbers
  • Insurance policies
  • Home inventory with photos
  • Family photos
  • Birth and death certificates
  • Backup of computer files
  • Medical records
  • Passports, visas
  • Banking and investment information
  • Wills and trusts
  • Pension and employee benefits information
  • Court documents
  • Mortgage records
  • Tax returns
  • Business records

o Gum and hard candy

o Flashlight & extra batteries

o Basic tools, such as work gloves, pry bar, N95 masks, duct tape, sheet plastic

o Lotion, sun block, lip balm

o Pocket knife

o Waterproof matches

o Cards, games, books, etc. for entertainment

o Extra house and car keys

 

If you have children, seniors, pets, or disabled members of your family, make sure that any special items they may need are included in their kits.

 

If there are items that you may wish to take from your home, such as family keepsakes, be sure to make a list so you know just what to quickly grab.  Keep that list with your kit.